Walter Bibliography

Brief Summaries of the Writings of

WILLIAM W. WALTER

Brief Summaries of the Writings of William W. Walter

These summaries are given in the same sequence that Mr. Walter listed his writings in the back of “Eschatology — What Is It?” and in each of the booklets of the Plain Talk and Common Sense Series. The date of the first issue of each work is given with its title. Many of the statements in these summaries are those Mr. Walter used when first notifying his students or readers of his newest work. As stated earlier, these descriptions indicate Mr. Walter’s motive in writing each book, or series of booklets, and also give the main idea(s) presented in each of these works.

Several of the books listed below have fictional characters, and are “novels” which present Mrs. Eddy’s concepts in a reasoning way. These are the works that Mr. Walter originally wrote for those with a Christian Science background. Nevertheless, the explanations given clarify to a considerable degree what Mrs. Eddy meant by the words she chose to express the concepts of mental causation.

The way the chief characters in each of these simply written stories resolve their problems, or convey ideas to others, is similar to the method Mr. Walter had himself proved effective in his own early teaching and healing work. The dialogue between the different characters in these books is often enlightening to a student, as it illustrates fair and thoughtful ways he may respond to the various attitudes of others who question him about his study, or about the benefits he has gained from this. “The Sweetest Story Ever Told”, though in narrative form, is non-fiction and non-sectarian.)

The Pastor’s Son
(1907)

This book originally induced many thousands to look into metaphysics, for it gave them their first real light pertaining to the truth of Being. In story form it presents the first reactions of the various characters to the concepts presented, and how they later responded after reasoning about these ideas. The young man’s experience is somewhat similar to Mr. Walter’s own early enlightenment; the prejudice and later change in the thought of the Pastor is representative of the way many have responded to the concepts given in this book. The explanation of creation, or “Genesis”, brought out as the story is developed, will give any seeker much “food for thought”. (This early insight into “Genesis” is further explained, in a wholly scientific manner, in Mr. Walter’s texts for his advanced courses in the study of the Science of Eschatology.)

The Doctor’s Daughter
(1908)

This is a sequel to “The Pastor’s Son”, and points out the fallacy of the popular concept of healing through medication or drugs. This book explains why medicines have no innate power of

their own, and also explains the use of thought based on certain principles as the way to health, wealth and happiness, through the “Walter Method” of right thinking. In this book, it is the daughter who first grasps the mental or “spiritual” concept, and the Doctor is the one who eventually reasons about this and changes his own thought and attitude.

The Arbiter of Your Fate
(1911)

This is a fitting conclusion to the previous two books, comprising a “set”. Those who have advanced out of the theoretical into the practical, love this book. It clearly points out the fallacy of believing there is a “Personal God” governing the fate of mankind, but also how equally fallacious is the concept that there is no “God” or cause that is a universal power for good. It shows how to utilize this good power to gain “salvation” from the results that come into experience from mistaken thought that is based on false concepts of self and Life. This book shows that each of us is the “arbiter of his own fate”.

Five Years In Christian Science
(1910)

“The cases of healing cited, with the author’s own experience, are authentic. The book, handed to those who are hopeless, has proved many times to be the cause of hope renewed.

“There is nothing that retards any certain case of healing or makes it more nearly hopeless than the hopelessness of the patient himself.

“Many who are ill, have, through their own reading or through believing a doctor’s verdict, come to the conclusion that their ills are hopeless and incurable. Rightly understood, there are no incurable cases. The patient’s hopelessness is the greatest retarding influence and therefore if this erring mental mood can be changed, the case is more readily met. The healings mentioned in this book were cited to show other sufferers that similar ills to their own had been healed, and why not theirs.”

The Healing of Pierpont Whitney
(1913)

One of the most perplexing subjects that the beginner in the unfoldment of the Science of Life has to deal with, is striving to understand the true relationship between Soul and body, God and man. In story form, this book gives some of the most helpful and important teachings of the disciples of Jesus, found in manuscripts written during the 325 years following Jesus’ works. In this book, it is clearly shown how the individual mentality, corrected through reason and understanding of Truth, can by the use of right thought eradicate any ill effects of its previous erring thinking.

The Unknown God – Volume 1
Matthew and Mark
(1914)

The mission of Jesus was not the healing of the sick, not the pardoning of sins; his real mission was to teach others the actual Science of Life, or God. Few are aware that underlying the simple words of the Scriptures, is the real science of Life, but “hidden” from those who are still not prepared to change their former concepts, and take full responsibility for their own lives.

It was his understanding of the actual goodness of Life that gave Jesus his wonderful power to do good. The results that ‘he’ obtained were not accomplished by setting aside the real laws of the universe, but by understanding these laws and conforming his thought and actions to them. Others called his works “miracles”. He knew them to be the positive and unalterable natural results that follow the correct application of the Science of Life. In this volume the “veil” is lifted from the scriptural passages, and the real meaning is brought forth.

The Unknown God – Volume II Luke and John
(1921)

Do you know that the book of John is not merely an historical biography of the life of Jesus, but is really the setting forth of the great truth that this is a mental universe, and that we live, move and have our being in mind (God)? Jesus sought to teach us, by precept and example, the truth of Life in mind, and not in body. John gained the spiritual (the mental) true viewpoint of the “Master’s” teaching. This mental or metaphysical sense is not apprehended by the casual reader, for his human viewpoint veils the true meaning from his comprehension. The books of Luke and John have been metaphysically interpreted, and their meaning plainly stated in Volume II of “The Unknown God”.

COMMENT ON THE UNKNOWN GOD VOLUMES: Mr. Walter’s careful research brought to his attention the fact that all the great teachers recorded in the Bible used what can be called a “code” that each later understander could properly interpret. This was described as “symbolic terminology” in the earlier booklets of information on Eschatology. To interpret a “code” does not mean a simple “translation of words”, but means to bring out the underlying meaning of the ways certain words are used, in connection with other key words. This is why Mr. Walter’s interpretation of the verses in the Biblical texts are usually much longer than are the verses in the Bible. By being able to decipher the code used by these great teachers, Mr. Walter shows that all the teachings in the “Four Gospels” are consistent in meaning, while this is not the case if one reads only the “letter” of what is presented there. The same consistency is brought out in Mr. Walter’s works in his explanations of essential parts of the entire Bible.

The Bible used by Mr. Walter is the one called “The King James Version.” Many scholars were kept busy for years translating, into English, early manuscripts that were written in their several original languages. Current-day translations into what is called “modern English” do not retain the real meaning of the Biblical teachers, because their own “coded” statements are changed when their phrasing is converted into current usage of English words and sentence constructions.

The Sweetest Story Ever Told
(1916)

This book embraces, in simple narrative form, the discovery of spiritual or mental conception; the birth and childhood of Jesus; the underlying meaning of the teaching he gave to his twelve disciples; and lastly, his crucifixion and resurrection by which he demonstrated his positive proof that there is a “hereafter”, and that life is not dependent on the body (as is believed by those who have wholly accepted the physical or material concepts of life). Mr. Walter cites references, and gives his practical interpretation of those early writings. The way all of this is presented in this book proves the reasonableness of everything stated

The Unfoldment
(1921)

Through sound reasonable answers to questions, this book explains the difference between the church scientist’s concept, and that presented by the “Walter Method”. It is most helpful in freeing a sincere student of the Science of Life from being “church-bound”. However, its common sense explanations are helpful to any student of Life.

The Sower, The Seed, The Soil
(1912)

The theme of this little story, with fictional characters, was suggested by one of the most beautiful and instructive parables that Jesus gave — the parable of the sower. Mr. Walter brings out its metaphysical, mental and spiritual wisdom. It can be seen that in this parable Jesus told the what, and the how of spiritual or mental healing. He also explained why some are healed and some are not, and when any healing will be accomplished. As the story progresses, deeper degrees of meaning are explained.

The Christ Way
(1910)

The “Christ Way” explains the true Science of Life in plain, reasonable language, and is of help to anyone seeking intelligent answers as to how to gain, or retain health, success and happiness in daily life. Mr. Walter said that this book could be read five times with greater benefit from each review, if given careful thought. Its common-sense standpoint, free of any mystical or religious views, also removes the prejudices that some have against any metaphysical study, because of having heard of the many unprovable theories that have been presented by various unscientific, or even false, teachers.

Allness of Good
(1924)

One of the great problems that confronts every earnest student of real meta-physics is how best to gain a demonstrable understanding of the allness of Good, and the consequent nothingness of “evil”. Rightly understood, the allness of Good is the fundamental principle that makes true mental healing a never-varying science.

Many honest workers fail to produce healing or betterment in their lives for no other reason than that they use the words and methods they have studied, without having realized the necessity of first proving to self this vitalizing principle. This book is of particular value to all students as they progress through the more advanced courses of study.

Other teachers, writers and healers make the mistake of speaking in a mysterious way of the “ultimate”, or of “high truth”, and crucify Reason. It certainly is crucifying Reason and relying on ignorance (evil) to look for a “higher ultimate” than the allness of Good. Ignorance of this principle of Life results in erring thinking, and its consequent wrong results, which have been generally classified as “evil”. Any “wrong” or so-called “evil” that is experienced is no more a part of the reality of Life than is a wrong answer in mathematical calculations. These result from mistaken thought and everyone knows these mistakes can be corrected. All thought about one’s self or about Life can also be corrected, through right reason, based on the allness of Good.

Mr. Walter called this 63-page leather-bound book “an ever-ready companion to consult whenever the individual thought is wavering as to the positive allness of Good”. It can conveniently be carried in a purse, or placed in a coat pocket.

Metaphysical Bible Lessons
(1926)

In this book a series of pertinent questions are asked referring to a number of different topics or “factors” in the Science of Life, and references are given to page, chapter and verse in the first volume of “The Unknown God” where the answers to these questions are found.

The first chapter in these Bible lessons is on “Thought”, the second subject is “Reason”, and the next one is “Mind”. Other subjects include “The True Concept”, “Consciousness”, “Intelligence”, “Cause”, and other similar topics. This method of study brings out how consistent and practical the teachings of Jesus actually are. This work is not only valuable to all students of Eschatology, for self-study, but is also useful in teaching children, and helps to give them some insight into the teachings of Jesus, and to have good standards to live by, in fairness to themselves and to others.

The Great Understander
(1931)

“This story embraces the eventful childhood of Mr. La Fontaine followed by his running away from home at the age of sixteen to satisfy his craving to see California.

“His frontier experience at railroading; his daring attempt to walk across Death Valley alone, as a mere boy; his life in the gold mining camps amidst the roughest and toughest of the frontier bad men; his death defying experiences with hostile Indians; his almost miraculous escape from death in Death Valley; his various experiences as local constable; his experience with stage robbers as a Wells Fargo Shotgun Express Messenger; his change of heart to become a mining engineer; his experience with Christian Science, and his subsequent confusion and utter helplessness, and finally his success with the Walter Method. A life story so exceptional, so fascinating, so thrilling and so enlightening, that to start reading it is to be spellbound to the finish.”

The Plain Talk Series
(1916 – 1925)

The booklets in this series are available to anyone. They are also used as the “text” for the “Beginner’s Course” in Mr. Walter’s Teaching Plan, because these 12 booklets bring out the essential basic points in the study of the Science of Life. These are thoroughly taught by the student’s teacher, and additional instruction is given as to how to specifically apply, or utilize, these fundamental concepts.

This series of booklets was originally written to present the meaning underlying Mrs. Eddy’s veiled textbook to sincere seekers for a truly scientific understanding; and to help those who desired to fully outgrow the “cradle” of the church, to do this just as Mr. Walter had already done. He was fully aware that many of Mrs. Eddy’s followers deeply desired to learn how to depend on their own thought to solve their own problems.

However, as everyone makes the same kind of basic mistakes, Mr. Walter soon found that these booklets were equally helpful to those who have never before studied metaphysics, nor had ever read Mrs. Eddy’s works. Furthermore, he found that his analysis and explanations of many of her statements were very helpful to all students in cultivating their own ability to reason, and to analyze what they study.

These booklets have also proved very useful to anyone who may have gained a misconception of mental causation from the writings of other authors who were either mere theorists, or perhaps even “copyists” who mixed many theories about life together, resulting in a generally impractical sense of Life, or some concepts of little use in daily living.

The titles of the “Plain Talk Booklets” indicate how truly useful they are, for beginning study:

#1 – Mental Practice #7 – Fear
#2 – Thinking #8 – Practitioner and Patient
#3 – Delusion #9 – Business
#4 – Sculptors of Life #10 – The Way
#5 – Your Supply #11 – Work
#6 – Harmony #12 – Rest and Joy.

These booklets are pocket-sized, so one or more can be conveniently carried to study whenever desired, or for easy reference when helpful. They are also available in Spanish.

The Common Sense Series
(1925 – 1940)

These booklets are used by students as “supplemental reading”; the first 20 of this series are used particularly with the Plain Talks or Beginner’s Course. They provide many explanations, carefully reasoned, in a practical, common-sense way, completely non-sectarian in presentation.

In this series, Mr. Walter explains how the Bible is actually a scientific, metaphysical work, and also shows that the teachings of Jesus are entirely practical, reasonable, and fully scientific. Many of the widely accepted physical concepts are also discussed in a well-reasoned way, and how to utilize thought constructively is also explained. Through carefully reasoning about the points covered in these booklets, and then by a sincere application of them, one can indeed free his mentality of many of the misconceptions that create problems, of various kinds, in his experience.

The titles of each of these booklets are listed in “Eschatology — What Is It?” and also in the back of each booklet in the Common Sense and Plain Talk Series. Mr. Walter’s own description of each set of ten, and of the last four of these booklets is given here.

In the first set of ten booklets, the principal motive is to lay a sure foundation as to the
“who”, “what”, and “why” of the one and only Cause or creator.

In the second set of ten, the motive is to show, simply and plainly, the application of right thinking to the healing of sickness and other “troubles”, and the reason why right application of thought will, and must, produce both healing and other right results.

The third set of ten takes up particular statements accredited to Jesus, and explains them according to the mental light that Eschatology, the Science of Life, throws upon them.

Beginning with booklet #31, the effort is to even more precisely show how to utilize the truth, and to fulfill the real purpose of Life.

It is evident, therefore, that each of these booklets is designed to cover some particular phase of the “science of last things” — Eschatology — which actually means the science of that which is everlasting, because true.

These booklets are of convenient pocket size and are non-sectarian. They are also available in Spanish. For those who desire to find out if Eschatology offers the kind of study they are seeking, particularly helpful booklets for this purpose are recommended in the referenced “Supplement”.

Letters of a Practitioner and Teacher
(published in 1923)

This booklet is a compilation of ten letters that Mr. Walter wrote to various students and patients, while he was still a Christian Science practitioner. Therefore these letters contain some of Mrs. Eddy’s particular terminology, and now and then she is referred to as “our Leader”. However, Mr. Walter’s very practical and succinct explanations of certain specific points are very helpful to every student and teacher of Eschatology.

The main points in each of the ten letters are cited here:

#1) Brief review of Mr. Walter’s own study and work; how to choose a guide or teacher; what
Jesus accomplished through utilizing scientific principles.

#2) Relationship of mind and body; Jesus’ statement that his body was a “shadow”; the power of one’s right thought; how to correct “sleeplessness” and “lung trouble”.

#3) Guidance to parents on rearing children; how to teach them a true sense of Life.

#4) Dispels several superstitions adopted by some church scientists; the part one’s sense of Life and of self plays in experience; difference between false and true sense.

#5) Fundamental thing to know: what is Cause, how does it operate, when do results come; chief errors that obscure knowledge; how each can know and utilize this scientific power for good.

#6) How to follow true path from “fancy” to fact, clearing out “worthless rubbish” that obscures facts; importance of proving by actual demonstration.

#7) How to clear the sense of hearing; why one can regain sense of perfect hearing.

#8) What true prayer is, and fallacy in usual sense of “prayer”; “God” as a “just and changeless
God (Good)”; how Jesus could teach that “the kingdom is within”.

#9) Way to success; right way to think about money; the processing of thought to fruition;
insight into the right sense of love.

#10) Encouragement and instruction to correct a “drug addiction”; way to regain dominion in and of one’s thought and actions, and again experience health, happiness and success; power of this patient’s own right thought.

Summaries of the Texts Used in the Advanced Courses

Mr. Walter’ s works, “The Sickle”, “The Primary Notes”, and “The Sharp Sickle” are used as texts for the courses that follow the “Beginner’s Course” in his Teaching Plan. These three more advanced texts are sold only to those who actually study with qualified teachers who have a “Teacher’s Permit” of current date. As Mr. Walter desired that his system of teaching be scientifically presented by every teacher, he required that these “Permits to Teach” be annually renewed. Before a student can purchase any of these three advanced texts, he must have satisfactorily completed the study and review of the course that precedes the text being purchased.

Mr. Walter did not place these restrictions on the sale of these advanced texts with any sense of downgrading the intelligence of interested seekers, but rather in recognition of their intelligence. He felt certain that the genuine seeker would particularly understand that the intelligent way to study any scientific system is to start at the beginning, and be taught it, in a step-by-step way. This system of teaching will correct any misconception of this Science, or of the way its laws operate, that any student might temporarily have simply because of some interpretation of what he studies in the light of his former concepts, or some “cherished ideas” of the way he has previously thought Life “ought to be”. Mr. Walter’s step-by-step teaching method makes it possible for each student to progress in a sound and sure way.

Each of these three texts have been translated into Spanish, as have the Plain Talks and the Common Sense booklets. This has been done because of a steadily growing interest in Mexico, where many who desire to study Eschatology know very little English.

The Sickle
(1918)

This is the textbook for the second course, for which the student is eligible when he has successfully completed the Beginner’s Course, and its review.

Mr. Walter described this text as a mental bridge constructed across the chasm of ignorance that lies between “matter” and “Spirit”, that is, between human belief and common sense — the misunderstanding and the understanding of self and Life.

The price of this book has been purposely placed high, so that it will be thoroughly valued, studied and frequently reviewed by each student as he continues his unfoldment to actual or full understanding. Those who have qualified to buy this book find that it is worth far more than is asked for it. They continue to gain further enlightenment from it each time they review this text, particularly in later years after they have assimilated the teachings of the still more advanced courses.

The Sickle is leather-bound, and consists of a Preface, Introduction, and 21 Chapters, for a total of 391 pages. It is printed on very fine-grade paper, and its size is 4 1/2 X 6 1/4″, so it can conveniently fit into a coat packet, or pocketbook, for study away from home.

The Primary Notes
(1919)

These serve as the text for the third course in Eschatology, and are actually “supplemental notes” to The Sickle. Therefore they are only sold to one who has completed his review of the Sickle Course. (This text is also called “The Mental Harmony Notes”)

This text includes a great deal of information that is quite succinct, and serves the student well in learning to apply more and more practically, in a steadily progressive manner, all that he has been taught. The directness in presentation of the essential points is extremely valuable. There are 20 chapters in this text of 70 pages, 8 1/2 X 11″, in notebook style, with cover. This form offers great convenience in study.

The Sharp Sickle
(1928)

This is the text used for the fourth course. It teaches not only the mental harmony that is possible, through the use of what is given in the preceding courses, but also teaches quite thoroughly the very Science of Being. The basic principles taught in the earlier courses remain the same, but The Sharp Sickle deepens and enriches the student’s understanding of all facts of Life, and of the universe, as well as of each individual being.

The student who has earned the right to have The Sharp Sickle, through his previous study and right application, treasures this book as invaluable, and he finds that further continued study of it steadily unfolds more and more of the fullness of Understanding.

The Sharp Sickle has a Preface and 37 Chapters, for a total of 568 pages. Its size is similar to that of The Sickle; it is also Ieather-bound, and its paper is of course very fine grade.

The Fifth Course in Mr. Walter’s Teaching Plan

This is called “The Teachers Graduate Class” and is presented in a different way than are the four preceding courses. It is the culminating course that all students may qualify for, and should have, whether they want to become teachers of Eschatology or not.